How to eat a BEAVER

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09/16/17 - 02/28/18

Harvest Season

1. Did You Harvest?

a photo of your harvest in the field!

 

The RecipeS:

 

The RecipeS:

FIELD NOTES

 

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The

HOW TO BE

What don't I know about beaver?
How do I locate beaver?
How do I become a certified trapper?
How do I set traps?
Where do I put the trap set?
How do I skin and clean a beaver?
What do I do with the fur?
How do I prepare this for eating?
How do I store or preserve beaver meat?
 

The RecipeS:

GEAR GUIDE

TRAPS

Conibears, or body gripping traps. They come in three sizes; 110s smaller, 220s and 330s the largest. You want the largest for beaver.

STAKES

You’ll need rebar trap stakes to hold against the strength of a determined beaver. 

WIRE & CLIPPERS

A roll of 11 or 12 gauge wire and some clippers allow you to secure the traps to stakes outside of the houses. 

KNIFE

A versatile trapping knife includes a sharp, clip point for penetration and detail work and a spey blade for general skinning. Stainless steel blades are highly resistant to rusting.

FLESHING KNIFE

The rounded end of a 4" carbon steel blade holds an edge while avoiding accidental punctures of the hide. 

FIELD SHEARS

A strong scissors makes quick work of breaking leg bones, leaving only skin for your knife blade to separate.

HEAD

Trapper hats on the trapline...

GLOVE LINERS

Look for windproof fabrics that block the breeze and sticky, dextrous fingers for dependable set management. 

RUBBER GLOVES

Full length, insulated, PVC-coated gauntlet gloves will keep you warm, clean and dry when digging arm’s length deep into mucky muskrat houses or into freezing open water. 

BASELAYER UPPER

Wear wool or synthetics next to skin. These fabrics transfer moisture, manage odor and continue to insulate after wet from a sweaty tree stand approach. 

INSULATING MIDLAYER

Get hotter and heavier with a fleece or pile sweatshirt.

SHELL JACKET

To protect your insulating layers from wind and precipitation, put on a hard shell jacket made from durable, waterproof, breathable fabrics.

UNDERWEAR

Ex Officio, always. Wear one pair all weekend with the most comfortable, breathable, quick drying briefs.

BASELAYER BOTTOM

Lightweight/midweight, wool or synthetic thermal “long johns” will trap heat right against the skin and wick away any moisture during periods of overheating.

INSULATING MIDLAYER BOTTOM

A synthetic fleece or pile pant maximizes the trapped and toasty dead air space, but sweatpants will work too. 

SHELL BOTTOMS

To protect your insulating layers from wind and precipitation, put on a hard shell bottoms made from durable, waterproof, breathable fabrics.

SOCK SYSTEM: ULTRALIGHT / LIGHT / HEAVY WEIGHT

Ultralight synthetic liner socks will transfer any moisture to a lightweight/midweight merino wool. Adhere a full foot length heat pad then layer on a heavyweight and expedition weight sock. 

 HIP BOOTS

Open-water trapping requires hip-height wading boots. Rubber is more resistant to tearing and easier to patch than neoprene. Size up for enough volume to accommodate insulating layers.

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REI Co-op Midweight Base Layer

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Equipment

Apparel

COMPLETE A BEAVER HARVEST?

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1. Did You Harvest?

2. Did You Eat?

3. Repeat!

You harvested a natural food source from your local environment. That's awesome. 

It's an honest, well earned meal. Proceeds from that license you bought will protect and sustain more acres of habitat for future animals. 

You deserve a reward. Maybe one day, after you submit photos of your hunt and harvest, you'll receive a beaver token, that unlocks merchandise exclusive to those are one with the beaver. That day is not today. But you're excited even without the incentive, you say?! Well, submit and share your bounty anyways! 

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Get oot and after it.

You are how you eat.

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