WILD BLUEBERRIES

Wild blueberries are smaller but sweeter than their cultivated high-bush cousins. They tend to be a little tart but sweeten as they ripen. They pack a tasty punch of flavor high in vitamin c and antioxidants.
Cooked over cast iron and campfire coals, this is the quintessential summer dessert.

July

Peak Season

1. Did You Harvest?

a photo of your harvest in the field!

 

The RecipeS:

2. Did You Eat?

a photo of your meal!

 

The RecipeS:

FIELD NOTES

 

1/1
How do I identify blueberries?
Where do I locate blueberries?
What is a ripe blueberry?
How should I properly pick and transport?
How do I properly clean blueberries?
How do I freeze or preserve blueberries?

HOW TO BE THE BLUEBERRY

Blueberries peak ripening is late July and early August. 

Good summer crops are boosted by above average snowpack, early spring temperatures and frequent summer precipitation. 

 

Two varieties of these low growing fruit bushes carpet open sunlit spaces.  They prefer sandy, acidic soil, more common in the coniferous forests of the northeast Arrowhead region. 

Take a weekend trip into the Superior National Forest or Boundary Waters canoe country. Seek out open spaces along hiking trails and forest roads. These early colonizers will be some of the first to repopulate recently logged or burned areas. Take a closer look at rocky outcroppings, hillsides and pine woodland clearings with thin cover.

 

The wood twigged bushes will grow between six inches and two feet fall, with short, oblong leaves 2-4 cm long, finely toothed and alternating on the stem. One variety has velvety leaves, the other are shiny. Clusters of white or pinkish flowers yield deep blue berries up to 10mm in diameter when ripe; white, green or pale blue when still immature.  

HOW TO HANDLE YOUR BLUEBERRIES

After picking;

- Leave in an open container where moisture doesn’t form.

- Do not wash the berries until just before using them, to prevent mushing.

- Keep them chilled, in a covered storage container, up to 10-14 days.

- Do not wash the berries before freezing them.

HOW TO FREEZE YOUR BLUEBERRIES

Freeze; 

Spread the blueberries on a rimmed baking sheet in a single layer. Place in the freezer for 2 hours.

 

Store; 

Transfer the frozen berries to a freezer bag or airtight container. Try something with a pouring spout. Keep in the freezer for up to 6 months.

 

Defrost;

Empty the berries into a bowl (to catch the juices). Let sit until they reach room temperature, 1 hour. The berries will be soft. Use them in smoothies, pies, pancakes, or muffins.

 

The RecipeS:

GEAR GUIDE

FORAGE BASKET 

For gathering walnuts.

HAMMER

For busting their husks.

KNIFE

For prying forth their fruit. 

Equipment

HEAD 

River rat bucket hat. Bonus points if it’s made from straw.

SUNGLASSES

A great all-around pair of fishing glasses includes the superior clarity of glass lenses with polarized, color-blocking technology that expose the presence of fish beneath the surface.

SHIRT

Tanks on the banks!

UNDERWEAR

Synthetic or wool briefs that wick moisture and prevent odor

SHORTS

Find a pair of durable, quick drying, stain resistant shorts with reinforced pockets.

FOOTWEAR

A hybrid sandal-water shoe with excellent traction allows optimal amphibious mobility.

Apparel

COMPLETE A BLUEBERRY HARVEST?

1/1

1. Did You Harvest?

2. Did You Eat?

3. Repeat!

You harvested a natural food source from your local environment. That's awesome. 

It's an honest, well earned meal.

You deserve a reward. Maybe one day, after you submit photos of your hunt and harvest, you'll receive a blueberry token, that unlocks merchandise exclusive to those are one with the blueberry. That day is not today. But you're excited even without the incentive, you say?! Well, submit and share your bounty anyways! 

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Get oot and after it.

You are how you eat.

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